Last edited by Dosho
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of The Lancashire Domesday found in the catalog.

The Lancashire Domesday

The Lancashire Domesday

[introduction & translation].

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  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Alecto Historical Editions in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Subtitle from spine.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21919444M
ISBN 100948459999

Places described as being In Craven in the Domesday Book fell later within the modern county of North Yorkshire, as well as neighbouring areas of West Yorkshire, Lancashire and Cumbria. Usage of Craven in the Domesday Book is, therefore, circumstantial evidence of an extinct, British or Anglo-Saxon kingdom or subnational entity (such as a shire Date: prehistory to 11th Century. Domesday carefully records the owners of each manor (estate) in , as these were the people liable for tax. All land was ultimately owned by the Crown, but held by lords, who provided military resources or tax in return. Tenant-in-chief in The main landholders listed in Domesday Book. Either King William himself, or one of around 1,

If you read Middle English and have a good microscope, and have a great interest in parts of Lancashire and Cheshire, you might find something here. The actual Domesday book is in the public domain, though, so you can probably find it online for free/5(5). The Domesday Book of , for example, witnesses that significant areas of land in Northern England were owned by a Gamel and Orm his son; they were probably Christian Vikings who had settled in the Lancashire-Yorkshire borders area, and by the middle of the 11th century Orm was already a man of considerable wealth and importance.

  This short three minute video covers what the Domesday book is ; Why it was written and what was involved in making it. I hope it helps:). Salford Salford was a settlement in Domesday Book, in the hundred of Salford and the county of Cheshire. It had a recorded population of 63 households in , putting it in the largest 20% of settlements recorded in Domesday, and is listed under 5 owners in .


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The Lancashire Domesday Download PDF EPUB FB2

Lancashire. The following pages include Domesday place-names and landowners, and beneath some are links to websites containing the local history of that place.

If you have a local history site that you would like to be included on these pages please get in touch via theContact page. Aighton. Blacheburn: King Edward held BLACKBURN. 2 hides and 2 carucates of Church had 2 bovates of this land and 's Church had 2 carucates of land in WHALLEY exempt from all customary dues.

In the same manor woodland 1 league long and as wide; a hawk's eyrie. Domesday Book, the original record or summary of William I’s survey of England. By contemporaries the whole operation was known as “the description of England,” but the popular name Domesday—i.e., “doomsday,” when men face the record from which there is.

What information is in the Domesday Book. Lancashire M-Z. Maghull. Magele: Roger de Poitou. Town adjoining Lydiate; moated site. Manchester. Mamecestre: St. Mary's Church and St. Michael's Church. City with a textile tradition dating back to 14th century Flemish weavers.

Transformed by the Industrial Revolution, it became an inland port. In the Domesday Book, it was used for some territories north of the River Ribble included together with parts of Yorkshire.

The area eventually became part of Lancashire, sitting geographically between the Rivers Lune and Ribble, in the strip of coast between the Irish Sea and Bowland Forest.

Domesday in gives the first documentary indication of the boundaries of the township of Preston, naming Broughton to the north, Ashton to the west and Fishwick and Grimsargh to the east (Ribbleton is not mentioned in Domesday).

The Ribble supplied the southern boundary. Lancashire There were 0 places in the county of Lancashire in Domesday Book. What does the Domesday Book contain. There are some towns and villages recorded in the Domesday Book, covering 40 of the old counties of England.

The majority of these still exist in some form today. Click on a county name on the map to continue, or use the list of links below it. To see full names of counties hold your mouse over the name.

Domesday Book encompasses two independent works (in, originally, two physical volumes): "Little Domesday" (covering Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex), and "Great Domesday" (covering much of the remainder of England – except for lands in the north that later became Westmorland, Cumberland, Northumberland, and the County Palatine of Durham  – and parts of Wales bordering, and included Language(s): Medieval Latin.

Cheshire (inc. places in North Wales) The following pages include Domesday place-names and landowners, and beneath some are links to websites containing the local history of that place.

If you have a local history site that you would like to be included on. The National Archives is the home of Domesday Book, the oldest surviving public record. Find out how to search for your town or village, and how to access images of Domesday along with an English translation, using our research guide.

Learn more about out why and how Domesday was created, and how to interpret it, in ‘Discover Domesday’; discover what life was like in 11th century England.

Domesday Book is the end-product of a general survey of England ordered at Christmas by William the Conqueror.

Contemporary sources do not explain precisely why he wanted it made, but he. Southport, in its original form, wasn't founded until Before that, the stretch of coastline between Merseyside and Lancashire was inhabited by the tiny village of Otergimele. It had inhabitants housed in 50 or so buildings and was first recorded in William the Conquerors' Domesday Book.

In the Domesday Book ofsome of its lands were treated as part of Yorkshire. The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire.

When its boundaries were established, it bordered Cumberland, Westmorland, Yorkshire, and tuent country: England. Latin, Agemundrenesse. InNorth Lancashire, Cumberland, and Westmoreland had yet to acquire the status of separate counties, a status achieved in the early twelfth Domesday Book the area is called Amounderness and described as an appendage to the royal lands in.

Morris, general ed., Domesday Book (35 county volumes (including the Boldon Book) and 3 volumes of indexes; Chichester, ) The English translations for the Great Domesday counties, together with images of the Latin text, are available in searchable form on CD, known as Domesday Explorer, published by Phillimore and Co.

Lathom was a settlement in Domesday Book, in the hundred of [West] Derby and the county of Cheshire. It had no recorded population (sometimes the case for large towns, as well as abandoned settlements).

Land of Roger of Poitou. In Domesday Book South Lancashire was described as an appendage to the county of Cheshire under the description of Land between the Ribble and the Mersey.

Like North Lancashire, the southern part of the future county was, or had been, under the control of a single Norman tenant-in-chief, Roger of Poitou, and was only sketchily described in Domesday.

Hundreds of Lancashire In the Domesday Book it was recorded as 'Lailand' hundred which was included in the returns for Cheshire. [2] However, it cannot be said clearly to have been part of : Ancient Hundred.

Preston was a settlement in Domesday Book, in the hundred of Holderness [Middle Hundred] and the county of Yorkshire. It had a recorded population of households inputting it in the largest 20% of settlements recorded in Domesday, and is listed under 2 owners in Domesday Book.

The Domesday Book, our earliest public record, is a unique survey of the value and ownership of lands and resources in late 11th century England. The record was compiled ina mere twenty years after the Norman Conquest, at the order of William the Conqueror. Finding Medieval Lancashire Documentation Rochdale in the Domesday Book Before the conquest, Game the Thegnl had jurisdiction over Rochdale (Rochdale was called “Recedham” in the Domesday Book,) except for six exemptions, which included “forestalingl”.Domesday Book: Yorkshire (with parts of Lancashire and Cumbria) (Domesday Books (Phillimore)) Paperback – January 1, by Ian Morris (Author)5/5(4).